2017 PEN Translation Prizes Announced

This year’s PEN Translation Prizes have just been announced.

The PEN Translation Prize for a book-length translation of prose into English goes to Tess Lewis for her translation of Angel of Oblivion by Maya Haderlap (a 2014 Festival Neue Literatur author from one of the years the festival was curated Read more …

Submit Now for 2017 Gabo Prize for Literature in Translation & Multilingual Texts

Lunch Ticket, the literary journal run by the MFA program at Antioch University in Los Angeles, is currently accepting submissions for its Gabo Prize for Literature in Translation & Multilingual Texts (Gabo was Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s nickname). This year’s prize will be judged by translator-poet Carolyn L. Tipton. No submission fee, $200 prize and publication for the winner (just publication for runners-up). You’ll find the submission details on the Lunch Ticket website. I’m rather taken aback by the contest’s language around securing rights for the translated works Read more …

Translation on Tap in NYC, Feb. 15 – 28, 2017

It’s February, it’s cold, don’t you want to be sitting indoors in the warmth somewhere at a great translation event? Here’s what’s on offer:

Thursday, Feb. 16:

Understanding the Long Tail of Linguistic Diversity in New York City​, a lecture by Daniel Kauffman of the Endangered Languages Alliance Read more …

Apply Now for the 6th Biennial Graduate Translation Conference

The Sixth Biennial Graduate Translation Conference will be hosted this year at the University of Texas at Dallas from May 26 through May 28, 2017. This student-organized conference was originally held at UCLA in 2004 and has since been hosted by the University of Iowa, Columbia University, and University of Michigan (the host of last year’s conference). This year, according to the announcement just sent around by the 2017 organizers, the conference “aims to highlight the ways in which translation impacts the humanities and society at large in the 21st century.” There will be two keynote speakers, Esther Allen and Breon Mitchell, both key Read more …

Translation Events at AWP 2017

In the past I’ve sat down and combed through the AWP Conference schedule to find all the translation events, but since ALTA (American Literary Translators Association) is now doing this labor, let me just link to

***ALTA’s Helpful List of Translation Events***

at the 2017 AWP conference this week in Washington D.C. There are over 40 events on the list, which makes me so happy – this means that literary translation has really established itself as any area of interest for AWP conference-goers. I’ll be participating in two of these events myself (both on Read more …

2017 PEN/Heim Translation Fund Winners

This is the 14th year of the PEN/Heim Translation Fund grants, made possible by a generous donation from translator Michael Henry Heim and his wife, Priscilla Heim, and there was yet again a record number of applications this year: 224! From having served on the Fund’s Advisory Board for several years back when the number of applications received was still under 100, I salute this year’s particularly hard-working judges, Tynan Kogane, Fiona McCrae, Canaan Morse, Idra Novey, Allison Markin Powell, Antonio Romani, Chip Rossetti, Shabnam Nadiya, Ross Ufberg, and this year’s chair Edna McCown. This year, as was announced today, 15 projects were selected for grants, translated from 13 different languages including Arabic, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese, and Nepali. Each of these translators will receive a $3,870 grant to aid them in completing their translations-in-progress.

Here are this year’s grant recipients: Read more …

Getting the Rights to Translate a Work: A How-To Guide

Since there are still so many misconceptions circulating about translation rights and their acquisition, let me put together a thumbnail sketch of how it all works. Translation rights can be assigned (sold or given away for free) only by the person or entity who holds copyright in the original work. In many cases, this is not actually the author. I’ve just pulled a book off my shelf: Bruno by Gerhard Falkner, a terrific novella about a writer who gets obsessed with a wild bear that’s been terrorizing livestock in the Alps near where he’s doing a writing residency. Have a look at the book’s copyright page (below), and you’ll see that the work has been copyrighted not in the name of the author but by the publisher. This means that in Falkner’s original contract with his publisher, Berlin Verlag, he sold his copyright in the work, which means that it is no longer his to sell or give away. Now, if you happen to make friends with Gerhard Falkner and convince him that you’re the right person to translate his book, Read more …