Apply Now for the 6th Biennial Graduate Translation Conference

The Sixth Biennial Graduate Translation Conference will be hosted this year at the University of Texas at Dallas from May 26 through May 28, 2017. This student-organized conference was originally held at UCLA in 2004 and has since been hosted by the University of Iowa, Columbia University, and University of Michigan (the host of last year’s conference). This year, according to the announcement just sent around by the 2017 organizers, the conference “aims to highlight the ways in which translation impacts the humanities and society at large in the 21st century.” There will be two keynote speakers, Esther Allen and Breon Mitchell, both key Read more …

Translation Events at AWP 2017

In the past I’ve sat down and combed through the AWP Conference schedule to find all the translation events, but since ALTA (American Literary Translators Association) is now doing this labor, let me just link to

***ALTA’s Helpful List of Translation Events***

at the 2017 AWP conference this week in Washington D.C. There are over 40 events on the list, which makes me so happy – this means that literary translation has really established itself as any area of interest for AWP conference-goers. I’ll be participating in two of these events myself (both on Read more …

2017 PEN/Heim Translation Fund Winners

This is the 14th year of the PEN/Heim Translation Fund grants, made possible by a generous donation from translator Michael Henry Heim and his wife, Priscilla Heim, and there was yet again a record number of applications this year: 224! From having served on the Fund’s Advisory Board for several years back when the number of applications received was still under 100, I salute this year’s particularly hard-working judges, Tynan Kogane, Fiona McCrae, Canaan Morse, Idra Novey, Allison Markin Powell, Antonio Romani, Chip Rossetti, Shabnam Nadiya, Ross Ufberg, and this year’s chair Edna McCown. This year, as was announced today, 15 projects were selected for grants, translated from 13 different languages including Arabic, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese, and Nepali. Each of these translators will receive a $3,870 grant to aid them in completing their translations-in-progress.

Here are this year’s grant recipients: Read more …

Getting the Rights to Translate a Work: A How-To Guide

Since there are still so many misconceptions circulating about translation rights and their acquisition, let me put together a thumbnail sketch of how it all works. Translation rights can be assigned (sold or given away for free) only by the person or entity who holds copyright in the original work. In many cases, this is not actually the author. I’ve just pulled a book off my shelf: Bruno by Gerhard Falkner, a terrific novella about a writer who gets obsessed with a wild bear that’s been terrorizing livestock in the Alps near where he’s doing a writing residency. Have a look at the book’s copyright page (below), and you’ll see that the work has been copyrighted not in the name of the author but by the publisher. This means that in Falkner’s original contract with his publisher, Berlin Verlag, he sold his copyright in the work, which means that it is no longer his to sell or give away. Now, if you happen to make friends with Gerhard Falkner and convince him that you’re the right person to translate his book, Read more …

Submit Now for Epiphany Magazine’s 2017 Translation Contest

Epiphany Magazine is running a translation contest this year, judged by Ann Goldstein of Elena Ferrante and Primo Levi fame. The top prize comes with $400 and publication in the magazine ($100 and publication for the runner-up). The $20 submission fee also nets you a year’s subscription. You’ll find details and instructions on the Epiphany website. (Where the instructions say to confirm “permission of the author,” I suggest you provide confirmation that the translation rights are available, since translation rights can legally be assigned only to magazines and publishing houses, not to translators, and must be assigned by the holder of these rights, who in many cases is not the author.) Deadline for submissions is Feb. 20, 2017.

A Joint Statement on the Executive Order Restricting Immigrant and Refugee Entry into the US

We the undersigned wish to affirm that freedom of expression and unfettered exchange of ideas are among the core tenets of our society as much as they are indispensable means of cross-cultural understanding and peaceful co-existence. Writers, translators and interpreters would be vulnerable to the far-reaching consequences of the travel ban; these professionals are crucial to the advancement of cross-cultural cooperation, and their efforts would be harmed by the corrosive effects of distrust and exclusion. If national security is our priority, we should recognize that we are safer with the knowledge Read more …

Translation on Tap in NYC, Feb. 1 – 15, 2017

Dear friends, as it is a proven fact that attending translation events lowers your blood pressure and helps you stop thinking about politics for at least one hour, it is my pleasure to recommend the following to you:

Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017:

Three Translators of Genius Translating Genius [sorry, I didn’t pick the title, Tr.]: Susan Bernofsky reading/chatting about Yoko Tawada, and Gini Ahladeff and Minna Proctor presenting Fleur Jaeggy. More information hereFort Gansevoort, 5 Ninth Ave., 6:30 p.m. Read more …